The Orange Tree 03/10

 

—Silence! the young girl said. Oh, why, Why will you talk to weary me?

Plague me no longer now, for I
Am listening like the Orange Tree.

The last few lines of this poem effectively display a strong conclusion to a powerfully emotive poem. It is at this point, the reader is made aware of the little girl. We as the audience, are presented within Shaw’s with the direct contrasts between the over-analytical and materialistic mind and perception of the adult, towards the naive and unburdened mind of a young child. quotes such as “—Listen! the young girl said. There calls No voice, no music beats on me; But it is almost sound: it falls This evening on the Orange Tree.” spoken in an enjambment to interrupt the analytical thought of the adult, the frustration of the child is ever apparent as the adult will never understand to appreciate the beauty of the environment for its face-value. Hence, in my belief the child’s frustration is one which is due to her own attempt to conform with the natural world rather than identify its properties and should be commended

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Peer Review 19/9

Hi Christella,

You have composed a truly beautiful written sonnet. Your continuity of rhyming couplets is a strong characteristic of your creative post and your post in general is strongly representative of Charles Harpur’s  originality and uniquely emotional sonnets. You are to be commended for such a vivid and imaginary piece

Keep up the good work!

From,

Brandon.

 

Christella’s Post

https://christellabade.wordpress.com/wp-comments-post.php

 

Peer Review 19/9

Hi Jesse, 

Your analysis and interpretation of Robert Frost’s quote was extremely extensive and thoroughly enjoyable to read, your use of external sources in your interpretation is to be commended and your  understanding of the quote is truly insightful. Your post has been composed with significant eloquence.

Keep up the good work!

From,

Brandon

Jesse’s Blog

https://wordsthought.wordpress.com/category/american-literature/critical/

Week 8 Blog

Do you share Robert Frost’s belief that “A poem begins in delight and ends in wisdom…it runs a course of lucky events, and ends in a clarification of life.” “The Figure a Poem Makes” (250-251)? If possible try to explain in your own words what you understand by this statement. Can you give an example of poem you have read that does just this?

 

The above statement is extremely relevant towards attaining an understanding of the general meaning within poetry. A successful poem will attempt to draw its audience in using strong visualisation and provide the reader with a much stronger moral or perspective on the composers set agenda. Taken for example from Frost’s own “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”, Frost with utilisation of the imagery of both visual and aural manners almost immerses the audience into the setting played out by Frost using the environment to represent the symbolism for the beginning and progression of life, and his stop being both a metaphorical and physical representation for his own choice to end his life. By the closing stanzas of the poem, the reader is completely aware of the personas intent to end his own life and represent the natural environment falling of the snow and his horse to be the internal conflict within his head in favour of the abrupt conclusion towards his life, addressing to his audience the significance of the landscape in portraying the ending of a life. Thus, Frost himself has portrayed the above idea of not only enticing his audience to further read the poem but also to leave them with a new vision of the life around them

Week 8 Blog

What does A.D. Hope’s poem Australia (written half a century after the 1890s) add to the debate on what is Australia?

A.D Hope’s contribution towards the beauty of the landscape is one that presents her in her rawest and her most beautiful. Hope demonstrates through the visual depiction of the land, as being harsh and barren utilising visual imagery to demonstrate the “Nation of trees, drab green and desolate grey”. Hope utilises an almost mocking tone to to welcome the thought of returning home “gladly” from the “lush jungle” of modern thought to the exposed landscape which the nation has to offer. Hope utilises this poem as a criticism towards the more “educated” elites such as the learned “cultured apes” whom will criticise the lack of civilisation in the Australian environment. However, as demonstrated by Hope, his home, nonetheless still calls to him to return regardless of the criticism received by the educated members of society against the dreary land of the nation.

Peer Review 12th September

Hi Quincy,

You have undeniably captured the style of Charles Harpur in your creative. You explicitly capture a unique perspective towards the emotions of love beautifully. However, please be wary on the capitalisations of your personal pronouns (I). Nonetheless a good creative

Keep up the good work!

From,

Brandon

 

Quincy’s Blog:

https://quincysteven.wordpress.com/2017/09/10/4th-blog-topic/comment-page-1/#comment-5

Peer Review 12th September

Hi Erin,

Your contrast between the two members of your family is extremely vivid and highly commendable.  You are able to vividly describe the significant contrasts between the two individuals on a spiritual and culture basis and allows us a strong insight into the members of the family

Keep up the good work!

Regards,

Brandon

 

Erin’s blog post

https://whatalittime.wordpress.com/2017/09/06/black-and-blue/comment-page-1/#comment-5

 

Week 6 Blog

What is Langston Hughes’ attitude to the way the Blues are being presented on Broadway? See “Note on Commercial Theatre” (876).

 

It is evident that Langston Hughes has attempted to express his disdain for the cultural appropriation of the blues produced predominantly by the African American people into the musical stylings of the predominantly caucasian musical culture. Evident in the stanzas; “And you mixed ’em up with symphonies and you fixed ‘em so they don’t sound like me.” Hughes shows concern towards the appropriations into “White culture” an perceives it as a theft of the African American cultural identity. This is also demonstrated by the stanza “Yep, you done taken my blues and gone. You also took my spirituals and gone. You put me in Macbeth and Carmen Jones” Representative of the evolution of the blues and other African American spiritual music into the early forms of Jazz and eventually popular music. In the last stanzas however, Hughes evidently reflects on a period of time in the future when the Blues will be appreciated for its cultural significance, rather than its incorporation into the popular music of the White people.

Week 6 Blog

1/ Charles Harpur’s love sonnets to Rosa are a model for all love sonnets. Using the style and structure of a Harpur sonnnet, write a love sonnet to your own beloved! Can you create images as fiery as his!

 

My Dear Beloved,

Lest my love be foiled in some cruel fate.

My heart burns its brightest when drawn on the thought of you

Lest my heartbeat fall into dire straits 

Know surely with the setting sun my nights are sleepless with your image

To see a glimpse of your eyes again, to glimpse upon the wicked smile

Would thrill me more than burning of Apollo upon a divided range 

And until I hold you, unless you accompany me down a floral aisle

My feelings for you, the winds of time will never be able to change

To hold you, once, twice, forever or even for a while.

Peer Review Week 5

Hi Christella,

I found your insight into the passage extremely compelling and well planned. Your discussion upon Twain’s use of visual imagery into great detail is commendable and you have effectively used references from the text to elucidate your argument further. 

Keep up the good work!

From,

Brandon

 

 

Christella Bade’s Post:

https://christellabade.wordpress.com/2017/09/04/blog-4-american-literature/comment-page-1/#comment-17